Marketing planet Earth one project at a time.

Posts tagged “film marketing

Course Correction

First Signal – color grade example.

I think it’s safe to say that there isn’t a filmmaker on the planet that isn’t affected by the current world crisis. The one saving grace with First Signal is that it was always scheduled to be in post-production during this time and won’t be finished until May anyway.  Color grading and sound mixing is moving right along.

While we all monitor for the opening of the economy (it’s vital this happens as soon as possible), the question is when and how to ramp up marketing and distribution efforts. I will say this, after submitting First Signal a few weeks ago to two film festivals, I have formally stopped until the film is 100% complete. With future submissions I will also require an assurance that a film festival will not default their festival from live to online.  I have ZERO interest in premiering First Signal online with a film festival. It will never happen.

I’m not surprised that only seven films took up Amazon’s virtual film fest offer. Unless Amazon’s screening fee was going to offset production costs, why bother. Any filmmaker can upload their film direct to Amazon, why dilute future distribution opportunities with an online premiere.

First Signal – private conversations

A few days ago a film festival I submitted to with a December event date, sent this long winded email stating generally that if people don’t feel comfortable attending or their theater isn’t available, they’ll make it online – and won’t refund submission fees. I frankly couldn’t believe the gall. I guess they’ll have to answer to the credit card companies who will chargeback the submission fees to the filmmakers. Having produced many live events, you as the organizer/promoter are responsible to execute what was contracted with the customer. If you don’t you must refund. It’s as simple as that.

I have never been a traditionalist.  From publishing to filmmaking, I have always taken an unconventional approach. When I launched my figure skating magazine years ago, I was told it was never going to work as I needed to do this or that or whatever. Whether it was budget related or simply because I had a different idea, I executed the way I could to accomplish what I needed to do. I brought that same approach to filmmaking. When I produced First World and quickly learned that festivals wanted shorts under 15 min long, I found science fiction festivals, unique events and, yes, online (a fledgling platform called Hulu) to present my first film.

My point in all this is being able to pivot. For better or worse the world has changed in the last couple of months. I’m not going to try to roll a square rock up a hill, when I can slide it on rails at ground level to the same destination.  As filmmakers we think unconventionally when we create our projects, the same should hold true for marketing and distribution.

Next plan.


Market Plan

As post-production continues on First Signal (we are on target for an April completion), I’ve been developing the marketing plan for the film. With the majority of independent films there’s no studio marketing department, no retained agency or staff.  Marketing is another skillset that filmmakers need to develop. Thankfully during my years of publishing magazines, and my own consulting business, marketing is something I’ve been doing for years. I had some excellent mentors in my early years.

I firmly believe that an independent film needs a central online destination. Building a website used to be a task that required a special set of design skills. Thankfully that is no longer the case. Wix is my preferred platform. If you know how to click a mouse, type copy and upload a video, you can have a website in no time. I no longer use their templates, but rather build my sites from scratch. Case in point my own personal website and First Signal’s.

While I was marketing First Signal through AFM’s platform, I came across one filmmaker who was promoting their project to attendees. This was not an inexpensive film. It had some known actors from the 80s and 90s. When they posted to check out the website, all the visitor found was the dreaded “under construction” notification. It was never fixed throughout the entire market. You spend all that time and money making a film, talk about a lost opportunity to introduce it. I can’t begin to tell you the thousands of films that are marketed through AFM—all looking for a home. As time is literally money at these film markets, you only really get one chance at a first impression. One critical component of first impressions is the trailer.

My favorite publicity still.

This past week I started to write the trailer. A trailer is perhaps the most important calling card of a film. Yes, a poster introduces the film, but a trailer brings it to life. As First Signal is what I hope to be a series of films in the “First World Universe,” getting it right is vital. In two minutes the goal is to condense the story, without giving it all away and to convince your audience to see more. There’s certainly no pressure to deliver!

While writing a trailer is challenging, it’s one that I do enjoy. It challenges me to look past the linear script and film and see how it can be presented to (hopefully) thrill audiences.

As screenwriters we all start with an idea. We look blankly at a white page on our monitors hoping it speaks to us. Our hands at the ready on the keyboard. Our notes, if any, to the side for glance. Then suddenly, the following happens:

Intro Logo/Intro Score: The Ashton Times

“This satellite intercepted a signal that originated from Lagrange Point Two.” VO General Reager over Milstar satellite.

First Trailer

A Milstar Satellite