Marketing planet Earth one project at a time.

Posts tagged “Toronto International Film Festival

First Still

Capturing the essence of a movie usually starts with the one sheet (poster), followed by stills and then the trailer.  It’s about developing the film’s brand and the PR campaign around it. For First Signal, the first official one sheet was designed by Daniel Elek-Diamanta (who is also our composer). The poster represents the famed “Earthrise” photo from Apollo 8 along with some sort of alien satellite or ship between the Moon and Earth. As the First Signal story is rooted in the Apollo space program, I thought the blend of science fact with fiction would make for a compelling picture.

With editing well underway, the next step in the branding process is to tell First Signal’s story through carefully chosen stills. Quoting Arthur Brisbane from an article in 1911, “Use a picture. It’s worth a thousand words.”

Our first “picture” tells part of the First Signal story with Air Force One arriving in Brussels, Belgium. To the casual observer they just see Air Force One over a newscast. But for those that are following First Signal, they will see much more.  Not only does the still lend to the logline, an emergency meeting with the President, it represents the arrival of Earth’s most well-known plane. I say Earth’s because something else arrives later in the story. The rotating planet Earth in the chyron graphic is later identified as another world. But it’s the crisis in Ukraine that leads to a government conspiracy to thwart an insurgent military action that’s at the heart of the First Signal story.

Over the weeks and months ahead, the idea is to create a campaign to bring awareness to First Signal for its release in 2020. When you consider the tens of thousands of films made in any given year, the marketing and communications efforts need to be just as well thought out and planned as principal photography was. For First Signal it’s about building off our early press.

As for building, next week I start the research process for AFM. But prior to AFM, I’ll be presenting First Signal next week to some interested parties that are traveling to Toronto.  

Finally, I’m re-presenting First Signal’s one sheet now with credits. As you will see, it truly does take a village to make a motion picture. While a director has a vision and acts as conductor, they are only as good as their orchestra. 

Next still. 


Last Shot

Conor Timmis (l-Cedric Yonah), Chris Goodwin (James Griffin) and Patience McStravick (Major Sampson).

Last Sunday First Signal wrapped principal photography. The final shot seemed particularly appropriate. It was a POV from Major Sampson (Patience McStravick). With Daniel Groom on camera, Patience guiding his shoulders to mirror her character and myself directing, it was that moment when I remembered the day all three of us met at a Starbucks in January 2018 to discuss First Signal.  None of us could have foreseen the journey that was to lie ahead. While pre-production was fraught with fits and starts, the train of principal photography not only ran on time, but finished five production days ahead of schedule.

Filming in the field.

Shooting First Signal these last few months has been nothing less than thrilling for me.  Oh sure, as director you worry about countless things, but when you see the progress and quality being produced from one day to the next, those worries quickly evaporate. Those pre-production matters that sought to derail the train are nothing more than a distant memory. Of course no vision comes to life without a dedicated cast, crew and location partners. Without their tireless efforts First Signal would still be just that—a vision.

Yefim Somin (l-President Tupolov), Wendy Hartman (President Colton) and Lindy Nettleton (Prime Minister Colby).

The vision for First Signal was nicely magnified by some wonderful press over the last several weeks.  WMUR-TV, The Concord Monitor, The Athol Daily News and the Greenfield Recorder all visited set (The Hippo did a great piece that you can find in my previous post). I couldn’t be more thankful for their coverage. It isn’t just about producing a film, it’s about getting it noticed. When you consider the tens of thousands of films that are made a year, having media support, particularly at this stage, is paramount.

Lindy Nettleton returned to the role of Prime Minister Colby in First Signal after first playing it in First World in 2007.

Throughout the production process and this past week, I have kept the contacts I made at AFM last year informed about our progress. While one during production was keenly interested in First Signal, another got back to me last night and wants to see some footage as soon as possible for TIFF (Toronto International Film Festival). In addition to the festival itself, Toronto is one of the major film markets.  

Stephanie Eaton (l-Elisabeth Seward) and Wendy Hartman (President Colton).

This is what producing a film is all about – distribution.  Putting aside getting an actual deal for your film, there are simply so many platforms to distribute and market you really need a distributor to navigate this labyrinth.

Putting together the puzzle that was created during production, is now the purview of our editor and the rest of the post production team. This is where the tone and style of the film come to life. We’ve already decided on a color scheme and I’m pretty close on what I’d like to see for a score. While I’m overseeing post-production, I’ll be working on branding and other marketing aspects. Yes, making a film is thrilling, but seeing it come to life in the consumer market is where it matters.

In closing, thank you to all those that have supported this project. Your support over these months have made First Signal possible.

Next steps.

With Patience and Dan on our last day of principal photography.

Market Forces

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First World screened at over 20 science fiction conventions before going to Hulu. It’s now available on Amazon Prime.

Prior to writing First World back in 2006 I would follow the film industry like most of the free world. You would learn about an upcoming film from TV, print or radio and then you would go to the theater and watch the film. From what I can remember most films in the late 70s, 80s and 90s had pretty good attendance in their first few weeks of release. Of course, VHS and DVD added substantially to the coffers and was a welcome lifeline to films that underperformed at the box office.

As I did in publishing over two decades ago, it’s one thing reading a magazine, it’s another learning how that magazine arrived in your hands from an industry point of view. But like that industry’s transition from print to digital, the independent film industry is also going through this same painful process. This article in Variety pretty much summed up the latest Toronto International Film Festival.

Evidence - Henri and Margaret argue

Two theatrical screenings and a VOD deal for Evidence turned Justice Is Mind into a feature.

It’s one thing when you work in publishing and you’re managing a downturn in paid circulation (thankfully I never had to experience that), it’s entirely another when someone or some company has advanced seven to eight figures to produce a movie and is waiting for a distribution deal to materialize. The magazine has revenue, albeit less, the film has zero. Because there is so much misconception about the independent film industry, let me be clear—just because a film gets into a major film market/festival is no guarantee of distribution. There’s also nothing wrong and everything to gain win self-distribution.

What I firmly believe this all comes down to is budget and marketing. Of course everyone needs to make a living, but there needs to be a reality check on what can seriously be recouped domestically and internationally. It’s no longer about just getting the film produced, it’s about making an effort with a marketing plan to reach a target audience. Marketing takes time. Believe me when I tell you it takes longer to market a film than make it.

Justice Is Mind - The FVMRI process begins

After a limited theatrical run and international premiere, Justice Is Mind is now available on Amazon Prime and numerous other VOD outlets.

I don’t know. Call me old fashion or just a consummate planner. There are some solid lessons to be learned from the magazine industry.  I just couldn’t deliver my magazines to our distributor and wait for revenue to roll in, I had to market on a regular basis. I had to bring enough awareness to my magazines to either get a paid subscription or a single copy newsstand buy. This all has to sound familiar if you’re a filmmaker. How do you get people to watch your film or buy it?

Denise Marco and Isabella Ramirez in Serpentine

After Serpentine‘s theatrical premiere, the short is now available on Amazon Prime and the Ice Network.

Stacey Parks asked in one of her blogs “You Making Money on Amazon?” Every month I get paid from Amazon from my four films running on their platform. Yes, some do much better than others. But there are sales every month.  I post three times a week to their respective Facebook pages that auto post to their Twitter accounts and other broadcast functions I have set up.  Google Alerts notify me of an interesting article that may warrant a pitch to an editor or, yes, a film financing entity or producer.

This all being said, I strongly believe in the future of independent filmmaking. For me the glass is always half full not half empty. It’s about coming up with a solution to a problem and seeing it through. I always pity the naysayer that says to me, “You can’t do this or that because…” Those are the people you give a wide berth to as you have, a…

…theatrical run.

SlateofFilms

What project will be next?


The Fall

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The Justice Is Mind sound wave as artwork by Daniel Elek-Diamanta.

Although fall doesn’t officially start until the 22nd, for most of us in New England, it starts after the Labor Day weekend. While I like the summer, I love the fall. It’s also the time of year when I tend to be the busiest.

This week starts another class at the Naval Justice School. In addition to falling back into my character as a Special Agent of NCIS, I’ll also be directing the mock-trial program on site for the agencies that retained us. I have to say this is one acting job I always look forward to. As the majority of the same actors have returned from the previous class, I think the same can be said for all involved.

What makes this a unique gig for actors is the ability to play a character for 11 days. As these are role-playing parts, once you have the situation memorized it makes for a great opportunity to really bring a character to life. The atmosphere of the school alone is what makes it engaging as a performer.

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Justice Is Mind expands to Udu Digital!

As for law and engagement, I learned this week that Kinonation, our distributor for Justice Is Mind, secured another outlet with Udu Digital. From their email to me, “Udu is an ad supported (AVOD) streaming service available on the Roku media player that’s used by over 13 million people every month in the US.”  It’s always nice to see another outlet picking up my first feature film!

And feature film is what the fall is also about. With the Toronto International Film Festival in full swing it’s always interesting to see what deals are struck. One film that did great was Chappaquiddick with a $20 million commitment. As a Massachusetts resident most of us know of the story chronicled in this film. It will be interesting to see how this film does in the state versus the rest of the country. At the end of the day the Kennedy name is nationally known. So that alone will carry some of the marketing.

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A behind the scenes shot when I was being taped for ESPN’s The Price of Gold.

But name and marketing will be key with one other film that is gaining substantial traction at the festival. That would be I, Tonya starring Margot Robbie.  While the film has been well reviewed, it has been reported that the film arrived to the festival without distribution. Of course that may have already changed, but the real question is this – what are the commercial aspects to one of the darkest moments in figure skating history?

In addition to being at the event in Detroit in 1994, I know some of the players involved (Nancy Kerrigan in particular). I was also interviewed for ESPN’s The Price of Gold documentary in 2014 about the incident. Part of me says this story has already been told…countless times. Is this the only story that figure skating can tell or could this mean a broader interest in movies around the sport? It’s impossible to tell at this point. And, you guessed it, I’m monitoring these developments because of Serpentine.

Finally, I wrap up this week’s post with a great piece of artwork from Daniel Elek-Diamanta. This is the sound wave from Justice Is Mind, Daniel’s first composing gig. He wanted a unique wallpaper for his computer. I’d say he struck the right chord!

Newport.

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Back to Newport this week!


The Inspiration

In SOS United States The Concorde returns to flight as Commonwealth One.

In SOS United States the Concorde returns to flight as Commonwealth One.

With the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) in full swing, I enjoy reading the dailies and the state of the industry. What was a relatively unusual trend is that The Hollywood Reporter, Variety and IndieWire all generally reported that this market may be a slower one due to a conflux of trends; from the availability of cast driven projects to disappointments at the box office from previous festival sales. Truth be told, there is no crystal ball to predict what will resonate with audiences.

But if there is one thing that has to resonate with me, it’s inspiration. If I am not inspired by the subject matter, if I don’t believe in the material, if I can’t envision it on the screen, I can’t get behind it. One only has to witness the disaster that was the latest iteration of Fantastic Four. The film was a forced project for the sake of “rights” rather than passion.

In Justice Is Mind mind reading technology finds a a defendant on trial for a double murder he doesn't remember committing.

In Justice Is Mind mind reading technology finds a a defendant on trial for a double murder he doesn’t remember committing.

With all my projects they are driven by something that inspired me. Whether it was the Apollo space program for First World, mind reading technology for Justice Is Mind or government conspiracies in SOS United States, it is the underlying material that motivates and inspires me.  It’s not enough for me to be a filmmaker, I must be a promoter as well. Because if I don’t believe in the project why should anybody else.

This past week I ran into someone at my gym who has seen my films and he asked “How do I do it?” He was asking about the recent press we had around the second anniversary screening of Justice Is Mind. My response was pretty quick, “Because I believe in it.”  I know how Justice has resonated with audiences. I know what their reactions have been after the screenings. But it was also coming up with an angle for the latest media push – second anniversary, positive audience reactions and a sequel in development with In Mind We Trust.  It gave the media something to tell their audiences.

In In Mind We Trust, the sequel to Justice Is Mind, the secretive FISA Court finds itself in the middle of mind reading conspiracy.

In In Mind We Trust, the sequel to Justice Is Mind, the secretive FISA Court finds itself in the middle of a mind reading conspiracy with the NSA and CIA.

And this is what the industry is all about – the audience. I sometimes think this vital attribute is missed by the vacuum atmosphere of festivals. An audience at a film festival is vastly different from one at the local theater. At a festival you are probably a cinephile or industry executive and will see just about anything, but it’s the real world of the local theater that shines light on what an audience wants to see.

As The Hollywood Reporter stated, “Despite a challenging climate for indie film financing” projects are getting done because of valuable co-productions. Indeed this is an industry about partnerships. I learned this when our location partners for Justice Is Mind also became valuable marketing partners. It’s about inspiring others to see your vision.

New developments.

In First World a covert military operation aims to stop China's first manned mission to the Moon.

In First World a covert military operation aims to stop China’s first manned mission to the Moon.


Official Selection

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On September 11, 2014 at 3 PM GMT the Viewster Online Film Festival (#VOFF) will commence and run through September 25.  The public will decide if Justice Is Mind advances to the jury who will announce the winners at the Raindance Film Festival in the United Kingdom on October 5th. While everyone wants to win, I’m just honored that Justice Is Mind was selected. For the first time, worldwide audiences will have the opportunity to see Justice Is Mind online for FREE.  As soon as the direct link to Justice Is Mind is sent to us by Viewster, I will post it here…and promote the hell out of it!

What’s terrific about Viewster’s festival schedule is that, for our film, it runs right through our Cape Code Premiere on September 18 at the Chatham Orpheum Theater. This is akin to the popular “day and date” releases I have been reading about for the last few years. How it impacts on Justice Is Mind will be very interesting. Will we see a spike in votes? Praise? Critiques? Whatever plays out, it can only help.

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The one thing all filmmakers love is organization. Both Viewster and the Chatham Orpheum Theater are so wonderfully organized. From the “creators kit” Viewster sends its filmmakers to the Chatham Orpheum’s staff and marketing team, it’s a filmmakers dream working with organizations that want to work with you.

I know it sounds cliché, but we are all in this together. VOD platforms and theaters need quality content and filmmakers need distribution outlets from traditional to digital. As I’ve said before, I will say again, I cannot stress enough the importance of both. Theatrical screenings build audience, awareness and press that just benefits you when you go to VOD. Likewise, VOD provides long term revenue to filmmakers.  The old adage if you build it they will come, in my view, just doesn’t apply to movies. You have to market to call attention to yourself. If you aren’t going to toot your own horn who is?

My PowerPoint presentation was approved by Cunard.

A sample slide from my PowerPoint presentation that was approved by Cunard.

Speaking about promoting, I’ve been reading the daily trade reports coming out of the Toronto International Film Festival. Again, it’s an honor if your film is selected, but dear lord the competition for attention is beyond the beyond.  When you read about the quiet market and how distributors are now placing films with A list cast on direct platforms like Vimeo on Demand, you know this is an industry in transition. But I still hold true to consumer curation. As long as a film is “findable”, audiences will watch what they want to watch either in a theater or online.

For anyone that has followed me on any regular basis, you know I’m all about marketing. Simply put it doesn’t matter what you do if nobody knows about it. When I first published niche sports magazines in the early 1990s, well before anything called the internet, we had, and still do to some degree, this wonderful device called direct mail. You can be sure that when the net came into reality I put our web address on our direct mail efforts. I was advised by so many “experts” not to do that. Seriously. Isn’t it up to the consumer how they want to buy your product? The same holds true for film, you just have to be in as many places as possible. You want to hear conversations like, “I saw this at the Orpheum” “I watched it on Viewster” and after October “I saw it on the Queen Elizabeth”.

From the global platform of Viewster to the intimate audiences at a state of the art theater like the Chatham Orpheum, this will be a tremendously exciting month for Justice Is Mind.

Day and date.

Justice Poster 4-page-0